parameter
status[274]
Technorati


http://technorati.com/

     
Language English



Launched November 2002
Closed May 2014



Developer Sifry, Dave



Country of Origin US America



Owner
2002 - 2014 Sifry, Dave



Topic Blog SeEn



Region No Limitation



Technology
and/or
Strategy
Real Time Search



Used SeEn Technorati



Older Version Internet Archive / WebCite



»The company's core product was previously an Internet search engine for searching blogs. The website stopped indexing blogs and assigning authority scores in May of 2014 with the launch of its new website, which is focused on online publishing and advertising. Technorati was founded by Dave Sifry, with its headquarters in San Francisco, California, USA. Tantek Çelik was the site's Chief Technologist. [...] First launched in 2002, Technorati quickly became the Internet’s premier blog search engine. In 2006, Technorati won SXSW awards for Best Technical Achievement and Best of Show. By 2008, the website was indexing more than 100 million blogs. Technorati was the only place online to find such a rich directory of blogs sorted by content type and Authority, a score assigned by a proprietary algorithm. The Technorati Top 100 quickly became a coveted space for the Internet’s elite blogs. Taking the relationship to the blogging world a step further, Technorati published its first State of the Blogosphere report in October of 2004. The report was published every year through 2011, and was rebranded Digital Influence Report in January 2013. After a half-decade of helping blogs and self-published websites gain exposure, Technorati took the natural step of helping those same types of websites earn revenue through an advertising platform launched in 2008. Since its launch, it has quickly grown into one of the largest ad networks boasting more than 100 million unique visitors per month. The Technorati advertising platform uses technology and real-time market insights to optimize digital advertising interactions across an expanding high-quality publisher network.« Source
»In February 2006, Debi Jones pointed out that Technorati's "State of the Blogosphere" postings, which then claimed to track 27.7 million blogs, did not take into account MySpace blogs, of which she said that there were 56 million. As a result, she said that the utility of Technorati as a gauge of blog popularity was questionable. However, by March 2006, Aaron Brazell pointed out that Technorati had started tracking MySpace blogs. In August 2008, Technorati acquired the online magazine, Blogcritics, for an undisclosed sum of money. As a result, Blogcritic's founders – publisher Eric Olsen and technical director Phillip Winn – became full-time Technorati employees. One of the first collaborative ventures of the two entities was for Blogcritics writers to begin writing descriptions of Technorati tags. In October 2008, Technorati acquired the online ad agency Adengage, Technorati CEO Richard Jalichandra wanted to use the AdEngage platform to expand Technorati Media’s offering, starting with an expansion of their advertising business from higher traffic sites. The AdEngage network added a reported 12 billion monthly impression growth to the Technorati Media Network. In April 2009, Blogcritics underwent a complete site redesign and switched content management systems. In 2009, Technorati decided to stop indexing blogs and sites in languages other than English in order to focus only on the English-language blogosphere. As a result, thousands of sites in various languages are no longer rated by the Technorati service.« Source
MELISSA RUTZEN (2013): »Founded in November 2002 as the first ever blog search engine, Technorati was founded to help bloggers and blog readers succeed by collecting, highlighting, and distributing the global online conversation. [...] Created and owned by Dave Sifry, Technorati is based out of San Francisco, California, and exists as open-source software, or software that is developed by a community of users. [...] As the number of blogs on the internet continues to grow exponentially, blogs are becoming an increasingly important source of information when researching topics of a wide variety. Unfortunately, as internet search engine users know, the more information available the more difficult it is to get the right information you are looking for. Enter Technorati to the blogosphere! Technorati is a blog search engine tool designed specifically to help users sift through the wealth of blogs and weblogs available on the internet. Technorati users can find blogs pertaining to their topic in two main ways: -> By entering a specific search query and viewing the results -> By browsing pre-sorted blogs and blog posts organized by topic and authority.« Source



Name

»The name Technorati is a blend of the words technology and literati, which invokes the notion of technological intelligence or intellectualism.« Source



Critical points

»In May 2006, Technorati teamed up with the PR agency Edelman. The deal earned a lot of criticism, both on principle as a result of Edelman's 2006 fake blog scandals. Edelman and Technorati officially ended the deal in December 2006. That month, Oliver Reichenstein pointed out that the so-called "State of the Blogosphere" was more of a PR-tool and money maker for Edelman and Technorati than a reliable source, explaining in particular: a) why Technorati/Edelman's claim that "31% of the blogs are written in Japanese" was "bogus", and b) where the financial profit for the involved parties was in this. In May 2007, Andrew Orlowski, writing for the tech tabloid The Register, criticized Technorati's May 2007 redesign. He suggested that Technorati had decided to focus more on returning image thumbnails rather than blog results. He also claimed that Technorati never quite worked correctly in the past and that the alleged refocus was "a tacit admission that it's given up on its original mission".« Source



Features & Functionality

»In May 2006, Technorati teamed up with the PR agency Edelman. The deal earned a lot of criticism, both on principle as a result of Edelman's 2006 fake blog scandals. Edelman and Technorati officially ended the deal in December 2006. That month, Oliver Reichenstein pointed out that the so-called "State of the Blogosphere" was more of a PR-tool and money maker for Edelman and Technorati than a reliable source, explaining in particular: a) why Technorati/Edelman's claim that "31% of the blogs are written in Japanese" was "bogus", and b) where the financial profit for the involved parties was in this. In May 2007, Andrew Orlowski, writing for the tech tabloid The Register, criticized Technorati's May 2007 redesign. He suggested that Technorati had decided to focus more on returning image thumbnails rather than blog results. He also claimed that Technorati never quite worked correctly in the past and that the alleged refocus was "a tacit admission that it's given up on its original mission".« Source



More

»The site won the SXSW 2006 awards for Best Technical Achievement and Best of Show. It was nominated for a 2006 Webby Award for Best Practices, but lost to Flickr and Google Maps. Technorati was recognized as one of the “2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies” by Lead411.« Source



References & further Publications

Wikipedia (EN): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technorati
Wikipedia (Others): http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technorati
     

Other Sources

Debi Jones (2006): "The Site that Ate the Blogosphere" URL: http://www.blogher.com/node/2509
History of Technorati URL: http://technorati.com/company/history-of-technorati/
About Technorati URL: https://web.archive.org/web/20041016033340/http://www.technorati.com/about/




Created: 2013-03-01